Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Enhanced Protection Against Influenza Virus Infection with Dispersion Controlled Lactic Acid Bacteria Powder

Version 1 : Received: 11 October 2020 / Approved: 12 October 2020 / Online: 12 October 2020 (13:09:21 CEST)

How to cite: Watanabe, T.; Hayashi, K.; Takahashi, I.; Ohwaki, M.; Kan, T.; Kawahara, T. Enhanced Protection Against Influenza Virus Infection with Dispersion Controlled Lactic Acid Bacteria Powder. Preprints 2020, 2020100242 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202010.0242.v1). Watanabe, T.; Hayashi, K.; Takahashi, I.; Ohwaki, M.; Kan, T.; Kawahara, T. Enhanced Protection Against Influenza Virus Infection with Dispersion Controlled Lactic Acid Bacteria Powder. Preprints 2020, 2020100242 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202010.0242.v1).

Abstract

We evaluated the change in water dispersibility of lactic acid bacteria (LAB, Enterococcus faecalis KH2) upon powderization and its influence on their efficacy. When cultured LAB are washed, heat-killed, and powdered, adhesion between LAB occurs and they form aggregation (non-treated LAB, n-LAB). However, a dispersed LAB (d-LAB) powder with less aggregates can be prepared by treating them with a high-pressure homogenizer and adding an excipient during powdering. n-LAB or d-LAB was administered to mice and the Peyer's patches in the small intestine were observed. n-LAB administration showed a high amount of aggregated LAB drifting in the intestinal mucosa, whereas d-LAB reached the Peyer's patches and was taken up into the Peyer's patches. Evaluation in a mouse influenza virus infection model showed that d-LAB was more effective than n-LAB in influenza yield of bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALFs) on day 3 post-infection, neutralizing antibody titers of sera and influenza virus-specific IgA in the feces on day 14 post-infection. Thus, the physical properties of LAB affect their efficacy; controlling their water dispersibility can improve their effectiveness.

Subject Areas

lactic acid bacteria; enterococcus faecalis; dispersion; viral infection; particle size; Peyer's patch

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