Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

The Impact of Water Loss by Evaporation and Calcite Precipitation on the Sodium Adsorption Ratio (SAR) and an Alternative Method of Estimating the SAR of Irrigation Drainage Water

Version 1 : Received: 1 October 2020 / Approved: 9 October 2020 / Online: 9 October 2020 (08:45:56 CEST)

How to cite: Zhou, Q.; Bleam, W.; Soldat, D. The Impact of Water Loss by Evaporation and Calcite Precipitation on the Sodium Adsorption Ratio (SAR) and an Alternative Method of Estimating the SAR of Irrigation Drainage Water. Preprints 2020, 2020100187 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202010.0187.v1). Zhou, Q.; Bleam, W.; Soldat, D. The Impact of Water Loss by Evaporation and Calcite Precipitation on the Sodium Adsorption Ratio (SAR) and an Alternative Method of Estimating the SAR of Irrigation Drainage Water. Preprints 2020, 2020100187 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202010.0187.v1).

Abstract

Soil water loss by evaporation influences the sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) of irrigation drainage water. Evaporation concentrates sodium and magnesium but calcite precipitation has a more complicated effect on soluble calcium and alkalinity. Here we propose a revised sodicity hazard assessment that quantifies the impact of evaporative water loss and calcite precipitation on drainage water SAR. This paper shows sodicity hazard is determined by the initial composition of irrigation water as originally suggested by previous researchers, and provide a simple, accurate way to identify the potential sodicity hazard of any irrigation water. In particular, the initial equivalent concentration of alkalinity and calcium determine the salinization pathway followed during evaporation. If the irrigation water alkalinity exceeds soluble calcium expressed as equivalent concentrations, drainage water SAR approaches an upper limit determined by the initial relative concentration of sodium and magnesium. If irrigation water alkalinity is less than soluble calcium, drainage water SAR approaches a lower limit determined by the initial calcium, magnesium and sodium. In both cases the SAR is scaled by the square root of the concentration factor √Fc quantifying soil water loss. To assess the impact of evaporation and calcite precipitation on the SAR and test the accuracy of the new sodicity hazard assessment, we evaluated data from previously published lysimeter studies. We plotted water composition boundaries for each source water, comparing these boundaries to the drainage water composition recorded in the lysimeter studies. As salinity increased by evaporation, each drainage water followed a distinct salinization path.

Subject Areas

sodium adsorption ratio; SAR; CROSS, electrical conductivity; specific conductivity; salinity; irrigation; groundwater; water quality

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.