Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Causal Association between Periodontitis and Parkinson's Disease: A Bidirectional Mendelian Randomization Study

Version 1 : Received: 6 October 2020 / Approved: 7 October 2020 / Online: 7 October 2020 (08:26:14 CEST)

How to cite: Botelho, J.; Machado, V.; Mendes, J.J.; Mascarenhas, P. Causal Association between Periodontitis and Parkinson's Disease: A Bidirectional Mendelian Randomization Study. Preprints 2020, 2020100145 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202010.0145.v1). Botelho, J.; Machado, V.; Mendes, J.J.; Mascarenhas, P. Causal Association between Periodontitis and Parkinson's Disease: A Bidirectional Mendelian Randomization Study. Preprints 2020, 2020100145 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202010.0145.v1).

Abstract

Latest evidence revealed a possible association between Parkinson’s disease (PD) and periodontitis. We explored the causal relationship of this association through two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) in European ancestry populations. To this end, we used openly accessible data of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on PD and periodontitis. As instrumental variables for periodontitis, seventeen single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from a GWAS of periodontitis (1817 periodontitis cases vs. 2215 controls) and forty-five SNPs from a GWAS of PD (20,184 cases and 397,324 controls). Eight non-overlapping SNPs of periodontitis from an additional GWAS assisted in the validation of association being studied. Multiple approaches of MR were carried-out. There was no evidence of genetic liability of periodontitis being associated with a higher risk of PD (B= -0.0003, Standard Error [SE] 0.0003, P = 0.26). The eight independent SNPs (B= -0.0000, SE 0.0001, P = 0.99) validated this outcome. We found no association of genetically primed PD towards periodontitis (B= -0.0001, SE 0.0001, P = 0.19). This MR study found no conclusive evidence to support a bidirectional causal genetic liability between PD and periodontitis. Further GWAS studies are needed to confirm the consistency of these results.

Subject Areas

Parkinson’s disease; Periodontitis; Periodontal disease; Mendelian Randomization; Bioinformatics; Oral Health

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.