Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Meeting SDG6 in the Kingdom of Tonga: The Mismatch between National and Local Sustainable Development Planning for Water Supply

Version 1 : Received: 14 September 2020 / Approved: 15 September 2020 / Online: 15 September 2020 (04:38:05 CEST)

How to cite: White, I.; Falkland, T.; Kula, T. Meeting SDG6 in the Kingdom of Tonga: The Mismatch between National and Local Sustainable Development Planning for Water Supply. Preprints 2020, 2020090328 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0328.v1). White, I.; Falkland, T.; Kula, T. Meeting SDG6 in the Kingdom of Tonga: The Mismatch between National and Local Sustainable Development Planning for Water Supply. Preprints 2020, 2020090328 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0328.v1).

Abstract

UN 2030 Sustainable Development Goal 6 presents difficulties for small island developing states such as the Kingdom of Tonga, which relies on rainwater and groundwater lenses for freshwater supply. Planning and managing water resources to supply demands in dispersed small islands under variable climate and frequent extreme events is challenging. Tensions between water planning using top-down versus bottom-up processes have long been recognized. Tonga’s overarching national planning instrument is the Tonga Strategic Development Framework, 2015-2025 (TSDFII). This identifies desired national outcomes and is used to direct and resource Ministries and address international and regional commitments. Water supply was a low priority in the three-month consultations that led to TSDFII. Community Development Plans (CDPs), developed by rural villages throughout Tonga’s five Island Groups over nine years, involved participation from 80% of each village population who ranked local priorities. Analysis of priorities in 117 available village CDPs reveals improvements to village water supply was the highest overall priority in all five Island Groups and ranked within the top three priorities by 76% of all villages, with women, youth and men returning figures of 83%, 66% and 80% respectively. The mismatch between top-down and bottom-up priorities appears to result from an urban/rural divide.

Subject Areas

groundwater; rainwater harvesting; climate variability; small island developing states; water planning; community participation.

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