Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Enteroviruses from Great Apes and Humans in the Republic of Congo: Recombination within Enterovirus C Serotypes

Version 1 : Received: 1 September 2020 / Approved: 2 September 2020 / Online: 2 September 2020 (08:49:42 CEST)

How to cite: Amona, I.; Medkour, H.; Akiana, J.; Davoust, B.; Tall, M.L.; Grimaldier, C.; Gazin, C.; Zandotti, C.; Levasseur, A.; Scola, B.L.; Raoult, D.; Fenollar, F.; Banga-Mboko, H.; Mediannikov, O. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Enteroviruses from Great Apes and Humans in the Republic of Congo: Recombination within Enterovirus C Serotypes. Preprints 2020, 2020090035 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0035.v1). Amona, I.; Medkour, H.; Akiana, J.; Davoust, B.; Tall, M.L.; Grimaldier, C.; Gazin, C.; Zandotti, C.; Levasseur, A.; Scola, B.L.; Raoult, D.; Fenollar, F.; Banga-Mboko, H.; Mediannikov, O. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Enteroviruses from Great Apes and Humans in the Republic of Congo: Recombination within Enterovirus C Serotypes. Preprints 2020, 2020090035 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0035.v1).

Abstract

Enteroviruses (EVs) are viruses of the family Picornaviridae that cause mild to severe infections in humans and in several animal species, including nonhuman primates (NHPs). We conducted a survey and characterization of enteroviruses circulating between humans and great apes in the Congo. Fecal samples (N=24) of gorillas and chimpanzees living close to or distant from humans in three Congolese parks were collected, as well as from healthy humans (N=38) living around and within these parks. Enterovirus were detected in 29.4% gorilla and 13.15% human feces, including wild and human-habituated gorillas, local humans and eco-guards. Two identical strains were isolated from two humans come from two remote regions. Their genomes were similar and all genes showed their close similarity to Coxsackieviruses except for 3C, 3D and 5’UTR region where they were most similar to poliovirus 1 and 2, suggesting recombination. Recombination events were found between these strains, poliovirus 1 and 2 and EV-C99. The same EV- C species detected in both humans and apes in different regions suggest a clonal distribution of the virus in Congo.

Subject Areas

enterovirus; nonhuman primates; humans; genetic recombination; emergence; Republic of Congo

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