Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

PEG-delivered CRISPR-Cas9 Ribonucleoproteins System for Gene-editing Screening of Maize Protoplasts

Version 1 : Received: 18 August 2020 / Approved: 20 August 2020 / Online: 20 August 2020 (04:34:55 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Sant’Ana, R.R.A.; Caprestano, C.A.; Nodari, R.O.; Agapito-Tenfen, S.Z. PEG-Delivered CRISPR-Cas9 Ribonucleoproteins System for Gene-Editing Screening of Maize Protoplasts. Genes 2020, 11, 1029. Sant’Ana, R.R.A.; Caprestano, C.A.; Nodari, R.O.; Agapito-Tenfen, S.Z. PEG-Delivered CRISPR-Cas9 Ribonucleoproteins System for Gene-Editing Screening of Maize Protoplasts. Genes 2020, 11, 1029.

Journal reference: Genes 2020, 11, 1029
DOI: 10.3390/genes11091029

Abstract

CRISPR-Cas9 technology allows the modification of DNA sequences in vivo at the location of interest. Although CRISPR-Cas9 can produce genomic changes that do not require DNA vector carriers, the use of transgenesis for stable integration of DNA coding for gene-editing tools into plant genomes is still the most used approach and it can generate unintended transgenic integrations, while Cas9 prolonged expression can increase cleavage at off-target sites. In addition, the selection of genetically modified cells from millions of treated cells, especially plant cells, is still challenging. These downfalls can be avoided with the delivery of preassembled ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) composed of purified recombinant enzyme Cas9 and in vitro- transcribed guide RNA (gRNA) molecules in a protoplast system. We therefore aimed to develop the first DNA-free protocol for gene-editing in maize and introduced RNPs into their protoplasts with PEG 4000. We performed effective transformation of maize protoplasts using different gRNAs sequences targeting the inositol phosphate kinase gene and applying two different exposure times to RNPs. Using low-cost Sanger sequencing protocol, we observed an efficiency rate of 0.85 up to 5.85%, which is equivalent to DNA-free protocols used in other plant species. A positive correlation was displayed between exposure time and mutation frequency. Mutation frequency was gRNA sequence- and exposure time-dependent. In summary, we demonstrated the suitability of RNP transfection as an effective screening platform for gene-editing in maize. This efficient and relatively easy assay method for selection of gRNA suitable for editing of gene of interest will be highly useful for genome editing in maize, since genome size and GC-content are large and high in maize genome, respectively. Nevertheless, the large amplitude of mutations at target site requires scrutiny when checking mutations at off-target sites and potential safety concerns.

Subject Areas

gene editing; mutagenesis; genetically modified; GMO; crop breeding; RNP; genetic screening

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