Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Concrete and its Effects on ConcreteCompressive Strength

Version 1 : Received: 5 August 2020 / Approved: 6 August 2020 / Online: 6 August 2020 (10:10:43 CEST)

How to cite: Itam, Z.; Zawawi, H.; Sivaganese, Y.; Beddu, S.; Mohd Kamal, N.L. Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Concrete and its Effects on ConcreteCompressive Strength. Preprints 2020, 2020080147 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0147.v1). Itam, Z.; Zawawi, H.; Sivaganese, Y.; Beddu, S.; Mohd Kamal, N.L. Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Concrete and its Effects on ConcreteCompressive Strength. Preprints 2020, 2020080147 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0147.v1).

Abstract

In recent years, the production of cement has grown globally in a very rapid manner due to the modernization of the world we live in, and after fossil fuels and land-use change, cement production is the third-largest source of anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide, CO2. Cement being the primary binding material for concrete and with the prospects for the concrete industry continues to grow so will the emissions of CO2. Hence, a method to reduce the CO2 production while keeping up with the progression of the concrete industry is very crucial in current times. This is where CO2 sequestration comes in. It is a process where CO2 is converted into a mineral which will then be trapped into the concrete forever. Required data to carry out the research between CO2 sequestered concrete and concrete without CO2 have been observed, obtained and tabulated as necessary. These data are then used to compare the concrete samples with one another and also prove the theoretical effects of CO2 exposure to concrete. Hence, experimental results on the compressive strength of the concrete samples for 7, 14 and 28 days has also been tabulated, graphed and further disputed. The objective of this research is mainly to determine the compressive strength of CO2 sequestered concrete in comparison with concrete without CO2 in order to decrease the effects the concrete industry has on the environment. The compressive strength of concrete samples with sequestration of CO2 gas is expected to be higher than of the concrete without CO2.

Subject Areas

sequestration; carbon dioxide; concrete strength

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