Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Adverse Drug Reaction Monitoring and Pharmacovigilance among Various Healthcare Professionals in India

Version 1 : Received: 2 August 2020 / Approved: 3 August 2020 / Online: 3 August 2020 (08:49:10 CEST)

How to cite: Kumari, A.; Haque, I.; Bhyan, S.J.; Sreelakshmi, M.; Goel, N.; Jain, A.; Thomas, B.; Hamid, K.; Chauhan, R. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Adverse Drug Reaction Monitoring and Pharmacovigilance among Various Healthcare Professionals in India. Preprints 2020, 2020080067 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0067.v1). Kumari, A.; Haque, I.; Bhyan, S.J.; Sreelakshmi, M.; Goel, N.; Jain, A.; Thomas, B.; Hamid, K.; Chauhan, R. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Adverse Drug Reaction Monitoring and Pharmacovigilance among Various Healthcare Professionals in India. Preprints 2020, 2020080067 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0067.v1).

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of healthcare professionals regarding adverse drug reaction [ADR] monitoring and pharmacovigilance [PV] in India. Materials and Methods: It was a questionnaire based cross sectional observational study. Data was collected with the help of data collection Google form that included the demographics and twenty two survey based questions. Data were analysed by using Microsoft Excel sheet, further analysed for results, including frequency, percentage, mean and standard deviation. Result: The questionnaire was filled by two hundred ten healthcare professionals in which 52.9 % were male and 47.10% of female. Most of the respondents were pharm d students (50.47%). Out of the total 91.4% responded to the definition of pharmacovigilance correctly. 87.6% participants said all ADR should be reported. 86.20% participants think Pharmacovigilance should be taught in detail to healthcare professionals. Most of the respondents (43.8%) always informed the patients about ADR while prescribing the medicines. Conclusion: Study revealed most of the participants have good knowledge about ADR and pharmacovigilance. Difficult to decide whether ADR occur or not and extra work load being major factors responsible for under reporting.

Subject Areas

adverse drug reaction; healthcare professionals; pharmacovigilance; surveillance form; suspected ADR

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