Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Density of Nocturnal Mammals in a Forest Patch in Bangladesh

Version 1 : Received: 30 July 2020 / Approved: 2 August 2020 / Online: 2 August 2020 (11:09:08 CEST)

How to cite: Al-Razi, H.; Hasan, S.; Ahmed, T.; Muzaffar, S.B. Density of Nocturnal Mammals in a Forest Patch in Bangladesh. Preprints 2020, 2020080014 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0014.v1). Al-Razi, H.; Hasan, S.; Ahmed, T.; Muzaffar, S.B. Density of Nocturnal Mammals in a Forest Patch in Bangladesh. Preprints 2020, 2020080014 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0014.v1).

Abstract

Tropical forests harbor complex communities that are linked together by biotic relationships. Asian forests in particular have lost many apex predators due to habitat loss. We studied a small forest patch in northeastern Bangladesh, Satchari National Park, to determine density and diversity of nocturnal mammals and evaluate their relationships. Transects were walked from February 2015 to July 2016 and density was estimated using distance sampling. Nine species of mammals (5 arboreal and 4 ground-dwelling) were encountered. Densities of the common palm civets, Paradoxurus hermaphrodites, Bengal slow loris, Nycticebus bengalensis, were the highest (19.48 and 15.03 individuals/km2). Density of small Indian civets, large Indian civets and Indian mongoose were lower (2.31-5.55 individuals/km2). Unexpectedly, a wide range of nocturnal mammals co-existed in this forest patch, in spite of fragmentation and severe disturbance. We did not find any significant association between any of the species studied, although this could be an artifact of low sample size. Conservation in Bangladesh remains a challenge due to high human population density. Thus, strict conservation measures are needed to permit the long-term survival of these species.

Subject Areas

Bengal slow loris; masked palm civet; common palm civet; conservation; forest canopy; density; Satchari National Park; tropical forest; Bangladesh

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