Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Dietary Fatty Acids Mediate the Secondary Messenger Phosphatidylinositol for Microglial Phagocytosis and Migration

Version 1 : Received: 20 July 2020 / Approved: 22 July 2020 / Online: 22 July 2020 (14:15:35 CEST)

How to cite: Desale, S.E.; Chinnathambi, S. Dietary Fatty Acids Mediate the Secondary Messenger Phosphatidylinositol for Microglial Phagocytosis and Migration. Preprints 2020, 2020070532 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202007.0532.v1). Desale, S.E.; Chinnathambi, S. Dietary Fatty Acids Mediate the Secondary Messenger Phosphatidylinositol for Microglial Phagocytosis and Migration. Preprints 2020, 2020070532 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202007.0532.v1).

Abstract

Alzheimer’s disease is one of the neurodegenerative diseases, characterized by the accumulation of abnormal protein deposits, which disrupt the signal transduction in neurons and other glia cells. The pathological protein Tau and amyloid-β contributes to the disrupted microglial signaling pathways, actin cytoskeleton, and cellular receptor expression. The important secondary messenger lipids i.e., phosphatidylinositols are largely affected by protein deposits of amyloid-beta in Alzheimer’s disease. Phosphatidylinositols are the product of different phosphatidylinositol kinases and the state of phosphorylation at D3, D4, and D5 positions of inositol ring. PI 3, 4, 5-P3 involves in phagocytic cup formation and relates actin remodeling whereas PI 4, 5-P2-mediates the process of phagosomes formation and further fusion with early endosome. The necessary activation of actin-binding proteins such as Rac, WAVE complex, and ARP2/3 complex for the actin polymerization in the process of phagocytosis, migration is regulated and maintained by PI 3, 4, 5-P3 and PI 4, 5-P2. Dietary fatty acids depending on their ratio and types of intake influence secondary lipid messenger along with the cellular content of phaphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. The deposited Aβ deposits and extracellular Tau seed disrupt levels of phosphatidylinositol and actin cytoskeletal changes that hamper microglia signaling pathways in AD. We hypothesize that being a lipid species intracellular levels of phosphatidylinositol would be regulated by dietary fatty acids. We keen to understand different types of phosphatidylinositol species levels in signaling events such as phagocytosis and actin remodeling owing to the exposure of various types of dietary fatty acids.

Subject Areas

Phosphatidylinositol; actin remodeling; phagocytosis; dietary fatty acids; Alzheimer’s disease

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