Working Paper Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Marital Domestic Violence and Maternal Health in Nigeria: Evidence from the Demographic and Health Survey

Version 1 : Received: 10 July 2020 / Approved: 11 July 2020 / Online: 11 July 2020 (03:49:45 CEST)

How to cite: Amos, A.P.; Mohammed Maimona, H.; Atsiya Pius, G. Marital Domestic Violence and Maternal Health in Nigeria: Evidence from the Demographic and Health Survey. Preprints 2020, 2020070225 Amos, A.P.; Mohammed Maimona, H.; Atsiya Pius, G. Marital Domestic Violence and Maternal Health in Nigeria: Evidence from the Demographic and Health Survey. Preprints 2020, 2020070225

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that the non-cooperative models describe household structures in developing countries more succinctly compared with the unitary model. Domestic violence against women, which is pervasive in Nigeria even though likely to be under-reported, will need to be understood within the framework of non-cooperative relationship between couples. In this study, we identify factors of domestic violence against women within couples who were currently in marital or cohabiting partnerships. Also, we investigate whether domestic violence influences the decision of women to terminate pregnancies. We use data from the 2018 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS). Multivariate logistic regressions were used to model the predictors of domestic violence, and its influence on the decision to terminate pregnancies among married women. Of the 8,910 married women interviewed for domestic violence, 35.33% had ever experienced a form of domestic violence. We discover that women: with higher education, that is not poor, and resides in urban areas have 44%, 18% and 15% reductions in the odds of experience domestic violence respectively. On the other hand, women who are employed, own land, having husbands/partners that are employed in the agricultural sector, and drink alcohol have 1.16, 1.2, 2.07, and 2.8 times increased odds of experiencing domestic violence accordingly. Also, we uncover that currently married women experiencing domestic violence have 1.25 times increased odds of terminating pregnancies compared with their counterparts that are not experiencing domestic violence. Effectively, poverty, low levels of education, residing in rural areas, drinking habit of husbands/partners, employment, marital capital, and land ownership status of women are risk factors of domestic violence against married women in Nigeria but can be affected by policies and programmes. Importantly, public actions to contain domestic violence in order to improve maternal health should be implemented in the context of the dynamics of a non-cooperative relationship existing between married couples.

Subject Areas

Non-cooperative Household Model; Domestic Violence; Maternal Health

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