Preprint Brief Report Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

About Dark Matter and Gravitation

Version 1 : Received: 8 July 2020 / Approved: 9 July 2020 / Online: 9 July 2020 (17:25:47 CEST)

How to cite: Haraux, A. About Dark Matter and Gravitation. Preprints 2020, 2020070198 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202007.0198.v1). Haraux, A. About Dark Matter and Gravitation. Preprints 2020, 2020070198 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202007.0198.v1).

Abstract

A close inspection of Zwicky's seminal papers on the dynamics of galaxy clusters reveals that the discrepancy discovered between the dynamical mass and the luminous mass of clusters has been widely overestimated in 1933 as a consequence of several factors, among which the excessive value of the Hubble constant $H_0$, then believed to be about seven times higher than today's average estimate. Taking account, in addition, of our present knowledge of classical dark matter inside galaxies, the contradiction can be reduced by a large factor. To explain the rather small remaining discrepancy of the order of 5, instead of appealing to a hypothetic exotic dark matter, the possibility of a inhomogeneous gravity is suggested. This is consistent with the ``cosmic tapestry" found in the eighties by De Lapparent and her co-authors, showing that the cosmos is highly inhomogeneous at large scale. A possible foundation for inhomogeneous gravitation is the universally discredited ancient theory of Fatio de Duillier and Lesage on pushing gravity, possibly revised to avoid the main criticisms which led to its oblivion. This model incidentally opens the window towards a completely non-standard representation of cosmos, and more basically calls to develop fundamental investigation to find the origin of the large scale inhomogeneity in the distribution of luminous matter

Subject Areas

gravitation; dark matter; redshift; big bang

Comments (3)

Comment 1
Received: 11 September 2020
Commenter: Richard Oldani
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: The currently accepted interpretation of gravitational field is geometrically motivated through application of the equivalence principle. It has been verified physically by the change in energy of "falling" photons (see e.g. Mossbauer effect). How do you explain these experiments in terms of a "push"?
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Response 1 to Comment 1
Received: 11 September 2020
Commenter: Alain Haraux
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: As explained in this short note, I am not a professional physicist, only a mathematician. I shall study your remark. I generally believe in experiments more than in "principles", since the domain of application of physical principles is usually left very vague. Mathematicians tend to believe only in "theorems", this is a kind of professional deformation. Thank you for the information anyway.
Response 2 to Comment 1
Received: 11 September 2020
Commenter: Alain Haraux
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: Dear Professor Oldani, I realize that your question concerns the action of gravity on photons. Actually in my short note I avoided this subject since the photon is not a material object. Whatever it is, I would imagine that the interaction of photons with "gravitons" would be of a dissipative nature. The torsion of geodesics for light in presence of matter could remain a consequence of the local gravific field and a priori there is no obvious contradiction with general relativity here. Especially since the exact nature of photons is still a problem. On the other hand, you might have noticed that the "pushing gravity" model destroys the concept of mass as an absolute number related to the "quantity of matter" in the sense that the actual "weight" of a material object will probably depend on its shape for a given number of nucleons. The variation will of course be undetectable for usual macroscopic but not gigantic objects. So that in practice the notion of mass remains the most practical way of computing the effect of gravitation.

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