Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Time to Cure and Predictors of Recovery among Children Aged 6-59 Months with Severe Acute Malnutrition Admitted in Jimma University Medical Center, Southwest Ethiopia

Version 1 : Received: 26 May 2020 / Approved: 27 May 2020 / Online: 27 May 2020 (08:59:02 CEST)

How to cite: Kabthymer, R.; Gizaw, G.; Belachew, T. Time to Cure and Predictors of Recovery among Children Aged 6-59 Months with Severe Acute Malnutrition Admitted in Jimma University Medical Center, Southwest Ethiopia. Preprints 2020, 2020050449 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202005.0449.v1). Kabthymer, R.; Gizaw, G.; Belachew, T. Time to Cure and Predictors of Recovery among Children Aged 6-59 Months with Severe Acute Malnutrition Admitted in Jimma University Medical Center, Southwest Ethiopia. Preprints 2020, 2020050449 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202005.0449.v1).

Abstract

Background: Treatment at stabilization center is an important intervention to avert the huge burden of mortality for children with complicated severe acute malnutrition (SAM). Recent reviews indicated a wide range in recovery rate (34-88%) due to several context-specific factors. This study aimed to estimate time to recovery and to determine predictors of time to recovery among children aged 6-59 month with severe acute malnutrition. Method: Retrospective cohort study was used among 375 children aged 6-59 months admitted in Jimma university medical center, from September 2015 to September 2017. Kaplan Meir estimate and survival curve was used to compare the time to recovery using log-rank test among different characteristics. Cox Proportional Hazard Model was used to identify significant predictors of time to recovery. Results: Median time of recovery for cohort of SAM children’s was 19 days (95%CI: 17.95-20.05). Independent predictors of time to recovery were: Play stimulation, vaccination status, Tuberculosis, malaria, use of amoxicillin, deworming and shock. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that the average length of stay on treatment and median time for recovery are within the sphere standard. Psychosocial stimulation, appropriate provision of routine medication and management of medical co-morbidity are needed to promote fast recovery.

Subject Areas

retrospective cohort; predictors; recovery; severe acute malnutrition; Jimma

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