Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

A snapshot on COVID-19: A review

Version 1 : Received: 28 April 2020 / Approved: 30 April 2020 / Online: 30 April 2020 (10:47:14 CEST)

How to cite: Mamun, M.A.; Mannoor, K.; Shirin, T.; Flora, M.S.; Qadri, F.; Ren, L.; Wang, J. A snapshot on COVID-19: A review. Preprints 2020, 2020040526 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202004.0526.v1). Mamun, M.A.; Mannoor, K.; Shirin, T.; Flora, M.S.; Qadri, F.; Ren, L.; Wang, J. A snapshot on COVID-19: A review. Preprints 2020, 2020040526 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202004.0526.v1).

Abstract

The emergence of novel SARS-CoV-2 virus in China in December 2019 has turned into a global pandemic through continued spread beyond borders. This review was aimed to extract up-to-date information on the evolution, transmission, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of COVID-19 to fight against this common enemy. PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar were the sources of literature; whereas CDC, WHO and Worldometer provided updated information. Bats served as the reservoirs of this virus while pangolin is believed as an intermediate host to transmit the virus to humans. Direct human-to-human and indirect transmissions were involved. Major clinical manifestations included fever, cough, fatigue, sputum production and shortness of breath. Chest radiographs mostly showed bilateral ground-glass opacities. Aged patients and patients with comorbidities had higher case fatality ratios. Critical cases were vulnerable to develop pneumonia, multi-organ failure and deaths. Overall situation in China has improved substantially. The European region and region of the Americas were the worst hit out of six WHO global regions. PCR based methods are used for the diagnosis of COVID-19. Severe/critical cases essentially require supportive or intensive cares. Avoiding exposure to COVID-19 is the best way to prevent the disease. Thus, this review provides a snapshot on COVID-19.

Subject Areas

COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2; origin; transmission; epidemiology; signs and symptoms; diagnosis; treatment and prevention.

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