Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Diet and Nutritional Factors in Male (In)Fertility – Underestimated Factors

Version 1 : Received: 17 April 2020 / Approved: 20 April 2020 / Online: 20 April 2020 (14:54:04 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Skoracka, K.; Eder, P.; Łykowska-Szuber, L.; Dobrowolska, A.; Krela-Kaźmierczak, I. Diet and Nutritional Factors in Male (In)fertility—Underestimated Factors. J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 1400. Skoracka, K.; Eder, P.; Łykowska-Szuber, L.; Dobrowolska, A.; Krela-Kaźmierczak, I. Diet and Nutritional Factors in Male (In)fertility—Underestimated Factors. J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 1400.

Journal reference: J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 1400
DOI: 10.3390/jcm9051400

Abstract

Abnormalities in male fertility constitute about 50% of all infertility causes. According to some data, the quality of human semen has deteriorated by 50-60 % over the last 40 years. A high-fat diet and obesity, the development of which is encouraged by the western lifestyle, affects the structure of spermatozoa, but also the development of the offspring and their health in later stages of life. In obese individuals, disorders on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis are observed, as well as elevated oestrogen levels with simultaneous decrease of testosterone, LH and FSH hormone levels. Healthy dietary models clearly correlate with better sperm quality and a smaller risk of abnormalities in parameters, such as sperm count, sperm concentration and motility, as well as lower sperm DNA fragmentation. Apart from mineral components such as zinc and selenium, the role of omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidant vitamins should be emphasized, since their action will be based primarily on the minimization of oxidative stress and inflammation process. Additionally, the incorporation of carnitine supplements and coenzyme Q10 in therapeutic intervention seems also promising. Therefore, it is advisable to have a varied and balanced diet based on vegetables and fruit, fish and seafood, nuts, seeds, whole-grain products, poultry and low-fat dairy products.

Subject Areas

semen quality; male infertility; nutritional model; diet

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