Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Invasive Alien Species of Bangladesh

Version 1 : Received: 24 February 2020 / Approved: 25 February 2020 / Online: 25 February 2020 (05:06:15 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Mukul, S.A., Khan, M.A.S.A., Uddin, M.B. 2020. Identifying threats from invasive alien species in Bangladesh. Global Ecology and Conservation, 23: e01196. Mukul, S.A., Khan, M.A.S.A., Uddin, M.B. 2020. Identifying threats from invasive alien species in Bangladesh. Global Ecology and Conservation, 23: e01196.

Journal reference: Global Ecology and Conservation 2020, 23
DOI: 10.1016/j.gecco.2020.e01196

Abstract

Bangladesh has a history of species introduction from different geographic regions. The country was a major trade route during the early-modern era and was under British colonial rule until 1947s. Many species of plants and animals are either domesticated or cultivated at different times that were brought into the country by the settlers, seamen, and traders. The deliberate preferences of fast-growing, high-yielding exotics in recent decades also threaten the existence of native species and their genetic resources in the country. Here we provide an overview of the invasive alien species in Bangladesh, likely pathways of their introduction, their impacts on ecosystem and people, and strategies for their effective management and regulation. Many exotic plants and animals both terrestrial and aquatic have found to be invasive in the country with negative impacts on local ecosystems, biodiversity, and livelihoods. Collectively, those species possess serious threats to country’s agriculture, forestry, and fisheries sector. Although initially introduced to favor primary productivity or other environmental benefits, many of these are now regarded as obnoxious pest or weed in Bangladesh. A comprehensive list of invasive species both for native and exotics and a framework to characterize them is also absent in the country. We recommend a separate statutory body and appropriate rules and policies for the introduction, monitoring, and management of alien species in the country. Community awareness, advocacy, surveillance, capacity building of relevant government staff and agreement with neighboring countries for transboundary management of invasive alien species is also necessary.

Subject Areas

biodiversity loss; climate change; ecosystems; exotic species; agriculture; forestry; fisheries

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