Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Reciprocal Heterospecific Pollen Interference among Alien and Native Species

Version 1 : Received: 7 February 2020 / Approved: 9 February 2020 / Online: 9 February 2020 (16:32:53 CET)

How to cite: Malecore, E.M.; Berthelot, S.; van Kleunen, M.; Razanajatovo, M. Reciprocal Heterospecific Pollen Interference among Alien and Native Species. Preprints 2020, 2020020110 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202002.0110.v1). Malecore, E.M.; Berthelot, S.; van Kleunen, M.; Razanajatovo, M. Reciprocal Heterospecific Pollen Interference among Alien and Native Species. Preprints 2020, 2020020110 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202002.0110.v1).

Abstract

1. Heterospecific pollen interference has recently been proposed as a mechanism contributing to the success of alien invaders, as heterospecific pollen of alien plants interferes with the reproduction of natives by reducing fruit and seed set. However, no study has looked at the opposite interaction. Moreover, few studies have considered the roles of phylogenetic and trait distances between pollen donors and recipients. 2. We did a large multi-species experiment in which we used alien and native species both as pollen recipients and as pollen donors, and included phylogenetic as well as trait distance as explanatory variables. 3. We found that both alien and native recipients suffered from heterospecific pollen from donors of the opposite status in terms of seed and fruit set. Phylogenetic distance and trait distance both affected heterospecific pollen interference, but the effect depended on recipient and donor statuses. 4. We conclude that heterospecific pollen interference affects both native and alien recipients, thus indirectly altering community composition and increasing biotic resistance against invaders.

Subject Areas

invasion ecology; biotic resistance; exotic plants; heterospecific pollen; reproductive interference; alien plants; indirect plant-plant interactions; Darwin's naturalization hypothesis

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