Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Association between Post-Diagnosis Particulate Matter Exposure Among 5-Year Cancer Survivors and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Three Metropolitan Areas from South Korea

Version 1 : Received: 20 January 2020 / Approved: 21 January 2020 / Online: 21 January 2020 (11:10:42 CET)

How to cite: Kim, K.H.; Choi, S.; Kim, K.; Chang, J.; Kim, S.M.; Kim, S.R.; Cho, Y.; Lee, G.; Son, J.S.; Park, S.M. Association between Post-Diagnosis Particulate Matter Exposure Among 5-Year Cancer Survivors and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Three Metropolitan Areas from South Korea. Preprints 2020, 2020010241 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202001.0241.v1). Kim, K.H.; Choi, S.; Kim, K.; Chang, J.; Kim, S.M.; Kim, S.R.; Cho, Y.; Lee, G.; Son, J.S.; Park, S.M. Association between Post-Diagnosis Particulate Matter Exposure Among 5-Year Cancer Survivors and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Three Metropolitan Areas from South Korea. Preprints 2020, 2020010241 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202001.0241.v1).

Abstract

Abstract: Cancer survivors are at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the association between particulate matter (PM) and CVD risk among cancer survivors (alive >5 years since diagnosis) is unclear. We investigated the risk of CVD among 40,899 cancer survivors within the Korean National Health Insurance Service database. Exposure to PM was determined by assessing yearly average PM levels obtained from the Air Korea database from 2008 to 2011. PMs with sizes <2.5 (PM2.5), <10 (PM10), or 2.5-10 (PM2.5-10) μm in diameter were compared, with each PM level exposure further divided into quintiles. Patients were followed up from January 2012 to date of CVD event, death, or December 2017, whichever came earliest. Adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for CVD were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression by PM exposure levels. Compared with cancer survivors in the lowest quintile of PM2.5 exposure, those within the highest quintile had a greater risk for CVD (aHR 1.31, 95% CI 1.07-1.59). Conversely, increasing PM10 and PM2.5-10 levels were not associated with increased CVD risk (p for trend 0.078 and 0.361, respectively). Cancer survivors who reduce PM2.5 exposure may reduce their risk of developing CVD.

Subject Areas

cardiovascular disease; particulate matter; cancer survivor; metropolitan area

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.