Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Interplay between Mediterranean Diet and Gut Microbiota in the Interface of Autoimmunity: An Overview

Version 1 : Received: 19 January 2020 / Approved: 21 January 2020 / Online: 21 January 2020 (02:58:57 CET)

How to cite: Tsigalou, C.; Tsolou, A.; Konstantinidis, T.; Zafiriou, E.; Efthimios, D.; Tsirogianni, A.; Bogdanos, D. Interplay between Mediterranean Diet and Gut Microbiota in the Interface of Autoimmunity: An Overview. Preprints 2020, 2020010228 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202001.0228.v1). Tsigalou, C.; Tsolou, A.; Konstantinidis, T.; Zafiriou, E.; Efthimios, D.; Tsirogianni, A.; Bogdanos, D. Interplay between Mediterranean Diet and Gut Microbiota in the Interface of Autoimmunity: An Overview. Preprints 2020, 2020010228 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202001.0228.v1).

Abstract

The nutritional habits regulate the gut microbiota and may provoke and/or prevent autoimmune disease. Western diet is rich in sugars, meat and poly-unsaturated fatty acids, which lead to dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota, disruption of gut epithelial barrier and chronic mucosal inflammation. On the other hand, Mediterranean Diet (MedDiet) is rich in ω3 fatty acids, fruits and vegetables and has anti-inflammatory properties, which can restore gut eubiosis. The effect of MedDiet and its components in health and disease states have been thoroughly analyzed in several studies. Moreover, several studies have specifically investigated the association between MedDiet, microbiota and risk for autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, the MedDiet has been associated with lower risk of cardiovascular diseases, which plays a critical role in reducing mortality in patients suffering from autoimmune diseases with comorbidities. The aim of the present review is to specifically highlight current knowledge regarding possible interactions of MedDiet with the patterns of intestinal microbiota focusing on autoimmunity and a blueprint through dietary modulations for the prevention and management of diseases’s activity and progression.

Subject Areas

autoimmune disease; autoimmunity; dysbiosis; Mediterranean diet; microbiome

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