Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

The Triangle Wave Versus the Cosine: How Classical Systems Can Optimally Approximate EPR-B Correlations

Version 1 : Received: 28 December 2019 / Approved: 29 December 2019 / Online: 29 December 2019 (11:28:25 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Gill, R.D. The Triangle Wave Versus the Cosine: How Classical Systems Can Optimally Approximate EPR-B Correlations. Entropy 2020, 22, 287. Gill, R.D. The Triangle Wave Versus the Cosine: How Classical Systems Can Optimally Approximate EPR-B Correlations. Entropy 2020, 22, 287.

Journal reference: Entropy 2020, 22, 287
DOI: 10.3390/e22030287

Abstract

The famous singlet correlations of a composite quantum system consisting of two spatially separated components exhibit notable features of two kinds. The first kind consists of striking certainty relations: perfect correlation and perfect anti-correlation in certain settings. The second kind consists of a number of symmetries, in particular, invariance under rotation, as well as invariance under exchange of components, parity, or chirality. In this note, I investigate the class of correlation functions that can be generated by classical composite physical systems when we restrict attention to systems which reproduce the certainty relations exactly, and for which the rotational invariance of the correlation function is the manifestation of rotational invariance of the underlying classical physics. I call such correlation functions classical EPR-B correlations. It turns out that the other three (binary) symmetries can then be obtained "for free": they are exhibited by the correlation function, and can be imposed on the underlying physics by adding an underlying randomisation level. We end up with a simple probabilistic description of all possible classical EPR-B correlations in terms of a "spinning coloured disk" model, and a research programme: describe these functions in a concise analytic way.

Subject Areas

singlet correlations; twisted Malus law; EPR-B experiments; local hidden variables; spinning coloured disk model; spinning coloured ball model; simulation models

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