Preprint Article Version 2 This version is not peer-reviewed

Incidence and Risk Factors for Severe Dehydration in Hospitalized Children in Ujjain, India

Version 1 : Received: 15 December 2019 / Approved: 16 December 2019 / Online: 16 December 2019 (05:14:30 CET)
Version 2 : Received: 15 January 2020 / Approved: 16 January 2020 / Online: 16 January 2020 (03:21:03 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Sharma, A.; Mathur, A.; Stålsby Lundborg, C.; Pathak, A. Incidence and Risk Factors for Severe Dehydration in Hospitalized Children in Ujjain, India. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 616. Sharma, A.; Mathur, A.; Stålsby Lundborg, C.; Pathak, A. Incidence and Risk Factors for Severe Dehydration in Hospitalized Children in Ujjain, India. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 616.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 616
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph17020616

Abstract

Diarrhoea contributes significantly in the under-five childhood morality and mortality worldwide. This cross-sectional study was carried out in a tertiary care hospital in Ujjain, India from July 2015 to June 2016. Consecutive children aged 1 month to 12 years having “some dehydration” and “dehydration” according to World Health Organization classification were eligible to be included in the study. Other signs and symptoms used to assess severe dehydration were capillary refill time, urine output, and abnormal respiratory pattern. A questionnaire was administered to identify risk factors for severe dehydration, which was the primary outcome. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was used to detect independent risk factors for severe dehydration. The study included 332 children, with mean ± standard deviation age of 25.62 ± 31.85 months; out of which, 70%(95% confidence interval [CI] 65 to 75) were diagnosed to have severe dehydration. The independent risk factors for severe dehydration were: child not exclusive breast fed in the first six months of life (AOR 5.67, 95%CI 2.51 to 12.78; p<0.001), history of not receiving oral rehydration solution before hospitalization (AOR 1.34, 95%CI 1.01 to 1.78; p=0.038), history of not receiving oral zinc before hospitalization (AOR 2.66, 95%CI 1.68 to 4.21; p<0.001) and living in overcrowded conditions (AOR 5.52, 95%CI 2.19 to 13.93; p<0.001). The study identified many risk factors associated with severe childhood dehydration; many of them are modifiable though known and effective public health interventions.

Subject Areas

diarrhoea; severity; severe dehydration; children; risk factors; Ujjain; India

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 16 January 2020
Commenter: Ashish Pathak
Commenter's Conflict of Interests: Author
Comment: Minor changes done according to reviewer's comments
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