Preprint Communication Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

How a Strategic Scoping Canvas Can Facilitate Collaboration between Partners in Sustainability Transitions

Version 1 : Received: 29 November 2019 / Approved: 30 November 2019 / Online: 30 November 2019 (09:52:47 CET)

How to cite: Wigboldus, S.; Brouwers, J.; Snel, H. How a Strategic Scoping Canvas Can Facilitate Collaboration between Partners in Sustainability Transitions. Preprints 2019, 2019110386 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201911.0386.v1). Wigboldus, S.; Brouwers, J.; Snel, H. How a Strategic Scoping Canvas Can Facilitate Collaboration between Partners in Sustainability Transitions. Preprints 2019, 2019110386 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201911.0386.v1).

Abstract

The commonly used words ‘transformation’ and ‘transition’ tend to lose their edge when used for any significant change process as is rather often the case. Partners and wider stakeholders in initiatives related to ‘sustainability transitions’ therefore often entertain different perspectives on what the strategic orientation of an initiative is or is meant to be. Common planning and design processes such as situation analysis and theories of change, however, often do not sufficiently cater to this dynamic. As a result, different actors may be pulling the initiative in different directions, undermining the overall partnership efforts. In this short contribution a strategic scoping canvas and an associated facilitation process are presented as a way of addressing such situations. Illustrations are provided of initial application in three cases related to food system transitions in Peru, Ethiopia, and Bangladesh, exploring the connectivity with approaches commonly used in the context of system transformations, including the Multi-Level Perspective on sustainability transitions, the Leverage Points approach, Capability Approach, and the theory of Large System Change. We conclude that the canvas and associated facilitation approach has proved useful in different contexts, offering opportunities for complementing existing methodologies, and potentially enhancing their efficacy in facilitated multi-stakeholder processes.

Subject Areas

multi-stakeholder processes; sustainability transformations; sense-making; strategy; theory of change

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