Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Exploring Mammalian Genome within Phase-Separated Nuclear Bodies: Implications for the Regulation of Gene Expression

Version 1 : Received: 6 November 2019 / Approved: 7 November 2019 / Online: 7 November 2019 (14:48:08 CET)

How to cite: Lesne, A.; Baudement, M.; Rebouissou, C.; Forné, T. Exploring Mammalian Genome within Phase-Separated Nuclear Bodies: Implications for the Regulation of Gene Expression . Preprints 2019, 2019110076 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201911.0076.v1). Lesne, A.; Baudement, M.; Rebouissou, C.; Forné, T. Exploring Mammalian Genome within Phase-Separated Nuclear Bodies: Implications for the Regulation of Gene Expression . Preprints 2019, 2019110076 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201911.0076.v1).

Abstract

The importance of genome organization at the supranucleosomal scale in the control of gene expression is increasingly recognized today. In mammals, Topologically Associating Domains (TADs) and the active / inactive chromosomal compartments are two of the main nuclear structures that contribute to this organization level. However, recent works reviewed here indicate that, at specific loci, chromatin interactions with nuclear bodies could also be crucial to regulate genome functions, in particular transcription. They moreover suggest that these nuclear bodies are membrane-less organelles dynamically self-assembled and disassembled through mechanisms of phase separation. We have recently developed a novel genome-wide experimental method, High-salt Recovered Sequences sequencing (HRS-seq), designed to identify chromatin regions associated with large ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes and nuclear bodies. We argue that the physical nature of such RNP complexes and nuclear bodies appears to be central in their ability to promote efficient interactions between distant genomic regions. The development of novel experimental approaches, including our HRS-seq method, is opening new avenues to understand how self-assembly of phase separated nuclear bodies possibly contributes to mammalian genome organization and gene expression.

Subject Areas

phase separation; nuclear bodies; self-assembly; genome organization; gene expression

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