Working Paper Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Phage Assisted Continuous Evolution (PACE): A How-to Guide for Directed Evolution

Version 1 : Received: 1 November 2019 / Approved: 5 November 2019 / Online: 5 November 2019 (02:19:01 CET)

How to cite: Popa, S.C.; Inamoto, I.; Thuronyi, B.W.; Shin, J.A. Phage Assisted Continuous Evolution (PACE): A How-to Guide for Directed Evolution. Preprints 2019, 2019110040 Popa, S.C.; Inamoto, I.; Thuronyi, B.W.; Shin, J.A. Phage Assisted Continuous Evolution (PACE): A How-to Guide for Directed Evolution. Preprints 2019, 2019110040

Abstract

Directed evolution methods are becoming increasingly popular, as they are extremely powerful toward developing new biomolecules with altered/novel activities, e.g., proteins with new catalytic functions or substrate specificities, and nucleic acids that recognize an intended target. Especially useful are systems that have incorporated continuous evolution, where the protein to be evolved undergoes continuous mutagenesis to evolve a desired trait with little to no input from the researcher once the system is started. However, continuous evolution methods can be challenging to implement in the lab and daunting for researchers to invest time and resources. Our intent is to provide basic information and helpful suggestions that we have gained from our experience with bacterial phage-assisted continuous evolution (PACE). Specifically, we review factors to consider before adopting PACE for a given evolution scheme, different types of selection circuits that can be utilized with particular focus on the PACE-B1H selection system, what optimization of a PACE selection circuit may look like using directed evolution of ME47 as a case study, and additional techniques that may be incorporated into a PACE experiment. With this information, researchers will be better equipped to determine if PACE is a valid strategy to use to evolve their proteins and how to set up a valid selection circuit.

Subject Areas

continuous evolution; protein design; protein engineering; phage; bacterial one-hybrid; plaque assay; mutational analysis; DNA sequencing

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