Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Optimization of the CO2 Liquefaction Process - Performance Study with Varying Ambient Temperature

Version 1 : Received: 8 October 2019 / Approved: 10 October 2019 / Online: 10 October 2019 (04:36:07 CEST)

How to cite: Jackson, S.; Brodal, E. Optimization of the CO2 Liquefaction Process - Performance Study with Varying Ambient Temperature. Preprints 2019, 2019100109 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201910.0109.v1). Jackson, S.; Brodal, E. Optimization of the CO2 Liquefaction Process - Performance Study with Varying Ambient Temperature. Preprints 2019, 2019100109 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201910.0109.v1).

Abstract

In CCS projects, the transportation of CO2 by ship can be an attractive alternative to transportation using a pipeline, particularly when the distance between source and disposal location is large. However, the energy consumption of the liquefaction process can be significant, making the selection of an energy-efficient design an important factor in the minimization of operating costs. Since the liquefaction process operates at low temperature, its energy consumption will vary with ambient temperature, which could be a factor that influences the trade-off point between pipelines and shipping in different geographic locations. A consistent set of data showing the relationship between energy consumption and cooling temperature is therefore potentially useful to CCS system modelling. This study compares the performance of a wide range of CO2 liquefaction schemes. It applies a methodical approach to the optimization of process operating parameters and studies performance across a range of operating temperatures. A set of data for the minimum energy consumption cases is presented. The main findings are that open-cycle CO2 processes often offer minimum energy consumption; NH3 based schemes often offer better performance at higher ambient temperatures; and that for the cooling temperature range 15 to 50 °C, the energy consumption for the best performing liquefaction process rises by around 40%.

Subject Areas

CO2; liquefaction; ccs; optimization; ambient temperature

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