Working Paper Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

D-Amino Acids are Signaling Agents Under Stress, that Broadly Impact Preventive Medicine

Version 1 : Received: 28 September 2019 / Approved: 30 September 2019 / Online: 30 September 2019 (03:13:27 CEST)

How to cite: Monselise, E.B.I. D-Amino Acids are Signaling Agents Under Stress, that Broadly Impact Preventive Medicine. Preprints 2019, 2019090334 Monselise, E.B.I. D-Amino Acids are Signaling Agents Under Stress, that Broadly Impact Preventive Medicine. Preprints 2019, 2019090334

Abstract

Three different fields intersect in search of an understanding of the point-of-origin of modern-age diseases: 1) D-amino acids and their role under stress conditions; 2) evolutionary origin of the mitochondrion organelle in the eukaryotic cell; and 3) gut microbiota and human healthHere it is first suggested that D-amino acids function as universal signaling agents, after having evolved as prokaryotic communication, part of an organic communication process that governs the basic activities of all the cells and coordinates cell action.Mitochondria (symbiotic prokaryotic organelles), are creative source of D-amino acids as signaling agents in the central nervous system and in the neuroendocrine systems.Amino acids racemases catalyzes the conversion between the L-enantiomers ( protein building blocks) into D-enantiomers (signaling agents).It is suggested that hectic modern life may affect human health by causing stress to the gut microbiota. These affected, gut microbiota then secrete D-amino acids that enter the blood stream, as signaling agents, causing communication errors in the central nervous system, and in the neuroendocrine systems due to excessive quantity of D-amino acids.Treating gut microbiota with inhibitors of amino acids racemases or finding D-amino acid scavengers may be used in developing novel therapeutic strategies for diseases related to the central nervous system and neuroendocrine systems caused by stressed gut microbiota.

Subject Areas

D-Glutamate and D-Glutamate racemase; Mitochondria; evolutionary approach; gut microbiota; Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS); Motor neurone disease (MND)

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