Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Contesting the Geneticization Thesis in Human Reproduction: Dealing with Spiral Shaped Processes and Technoscientific Imaginaries

Version 1 : Received: 23 September 2019 / Approved: 24 September 2019 / Online: 24 September 2019 (05:32:19 CEST)

How to cite: Alon, I.; Guimon, J.; Urbanos-Garrido, R. Contesting the Geneticization Thesis in Human Reproduction: Dealing with Spiral Shaped Processes and Technoscientific Imaginaries. Preprints 2019, 2019090269 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201909.0269.v1). Alon, I.; Guimon, J.; Urbanos-Garrido, R. Contesting the Geneticization Thesis in Human Reproduction: Dealing with Spiral Shaped Processes and Technoscientific Imaginaries. Preprints 2019, 2019090269 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201909.0269.v1).

Abstract

This paper questions the potential shift of reproduction towards assisted reproductive technologies due to benefits provided by genetic manipulation of embryos. In order to examine the viability of such a shift and its implications from a regulatory perspective, we relied on two panels of experts from Israel and Spain, using the Delphi method and a series of in-depth interviews. We anticipate, at a first stage, a continuous-steady growth in the use of IVF, supplemented by preimplantation genetic diagnosis and the introduction of CRISPR/Cas. At a second stage, attracting a growing share of fertile people would require developments in genomics. While it is unclear whether these developments will fully materialize, they could be replaced by technoscientific imaginaries generating perceived benefits. We conclude that the regulation of reproductive genetics is becoming more critical and complex. The aim should be to ensure good practices and equity, while providing more information to the public. A broad and inclusive societal debate may overcome the difficulty of drawing a clear line between medical uses and non-medical uses of genetic selection and engineering and may contribute to finding the right balance between allowing autonomous decisions of patients and protecting the public interest.

Subject Areas

assisted reproductive technologies; In-Vitro Fertilization; Delphi; geneticization; Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis; diffusion of innovation

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