Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Optical Trajectory Manipulations Using the Self-Written Waveguides Technique

Version 1 : Received: 4 September 2019 / Approved: 5 September 2019 / Online: 5 September 2019 (15:44:49 CEST)

How to cite: Malallah, R.; Cassidy, D.; Wan, M.; muniraj, I.; Healy, J.; Sheridan, J. Optical Trajectory Manipulations Using the Self-Written Waveguides Technique. Preprints 2019, 2019090064 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201909.0064.v1). Malallah, R.; Cassidy, D.; Wan, M.; muniraj, I.; Healy, J.; Sheridan, J. Optical Trajectory Manipulations Using the Self-Written Waveguides Technique. Preprints 2019, 2019090064 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201909.0064.v1).

Abstract

In this paper, first the Self-Written Waveguide (SWW) process in wet photopolymer media (liquid solutions), are examined for three examples: single-, counter-, and co-fibers exposure. Then the SWWs formed inside solid material are examined including the effects of manipulating the alignment of the fibers. In all cases high precision measurements are used to position the fiber optic cables (FOCs) before exposure using a microscope. The self-writing process is indirectly monitored by observing (imaging) the light emerging from the side of the material sample during SWW formation. In this way the optical waveguide trajectories formed in an Acrylamide/Polyvinyl Alcohol (AA/PVA) a photopolymer material (sensitized at 532 nm) are examined. First the transmission of light by this material is characterized. Then the bending and merging of the waveguides which occur are investigated. The predictions of our model are shown to qualitatively agree with the observed trajectories. The largest index changes taking place at any time during the exposure, i.e. during SWW formation, are shown to take place at the positions where the largest exposure light intensity is present. Typically, such maxima exist close to the input face and the first maximum is referred to as the location of the Primary Eye. Other local maxima also appear further along the SWW and are referred to as Secondary Eyes, i.e. deeper within the material.

Subject Areas

Self-Written Waveguide; photo-polymer; fiber optics

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