Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Physiological and Spectral Response of the Halophyte Suaeda Salsa to Salt Stress in a Coastal Wetland Area

Version 1 : Received: 29 August 2019 / Approved: 30 August 2019 / Online: 30 August 2019 (06:19:09 CEST)

How to cite: Lu, X.; Tian, Y.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Li, Y.; Wen, R.; Lin, Y.; Yan, Z. Physiological and Spectral Response of the Halophyte Suaeda Salsa to Salt Stress in a Coastal Wetland Area. Preprints 2019, 2019080317 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201908.0317.v1). Lu, X.; Tian, Y.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Li, Y.; Wen, R.; Lin, Y.; Yan, Z. Physiological and Spectral Response of the Halophyte Suaeda Salsa to Salt Stress in a Coastal Wetland Area. Preprints 2019, 2019080317 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201908.0317.v1).

Abstract

In order to understand the response mechanism between plant stress, physiological indicators and hyperspectral indices, pot experiments were conducted on Suaeda salsa seedlings collected from a coastal wetland area to reveal the effects of salt stress on the physiological indicators and reflectance spectra of Suaeda salsa at the canopy and leaf level. The Suaeda salsa seedlings were exposed to seven salt treatments of different concentrations (0 mmol/L (control), 50 mmol/L, 100 mmol/L, 200 mmol/L, 300 mmol/L, 400 mmol/L, and 600 mmol/L) in natural conditions. The physiological indicators of plant height, fresh weight, dry weight, leaf succulence, chlorophyll content, and carotenoid content were measured, in addition to the reflectance spectra of Suaeda salsa at both the canopy and leaf level. Firstly, the effects of salt stress on the physiological indicators and reflectance spectra were analyzed by the qualitative and quantitative methods. Then, physiological indicators sensitive to salt stress were further retrieved. Afterwards hyperspectral indices such as a/b and ((a-b)/(a+b) ) sensitive to salt stress were also extracted by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls (S-N-K) comparison test. Our results showed that plant height, root length, leaf succulence, biomass, Chl-a, and Chl-b were sensitive to salt stress, while carotenoids (Car) and relative water content on the root were not significantly affected by salt stress. At the salt concentration of 200 mmol/L, plant height, biomass, relative water content, leaf succulence peaked. With enhanced salt stress, physiological indicators decreased. The first-order derivative spectral reflectance has the highest correlation with salt stress, compared to the control. The spectral index most sensitive to the salt stress at the canopy level is (D903−D851)/(D903+D851), for which the multiple determination coefficient (r2) is 0.9216. While the most sensitive spectral index to the salt stress is (D442−D667)/(D442+D667) at the leaf level, for which the r2 is −0.898. In summary, the results indicated that there exists the quantitative relationship between the physiological indicators and spectra reflectance under salt stress and hyperspectral plant indices can effectively estimate the degree of salt stress. The inconsistency between the diagnostic hyperspectral plant indices at the canopy and leaf levels may be caused by the observation conditions, canopy structure.

Subject Areas

physiological indicators; reflectance spectra; Suaeda salsa; salt stress; coastal wetland

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