Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Impact of Biochar Application on Carbon Dynamics and Fertility of Soils Over-fertilization with Compost

Version 1 : Received: 17 June 2019 / Approved: 18 June 2019 / Online: 18 June 2019 (10:46:56 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Tsai, C.-C.; Chang, Y.-F. Carbon Dynamics and Fertility in Biochar-Amended Soils with Excessive Compost Application. Agronomy 2019, 9, 511. Tsai, C.-C.; Chang, Y.-F. Carbon Dynamics and Fertility in Biochar-Amended Soils with Excessive Compost Application. Agronomy 2019, 9, 511.

Journal reference: Agronomy 2019, 9, 511
DOI: 10.3390/agronomy9090511

Abstract

In Taiwan, farmers often apply excess compost to ensure adequate crop yield in highly frequent tillage, highly weathered, and lower fertility soils. The potential of biochar (BC) for diminishing soil C mineralization, and improving soil nutrient availability in compost over-fertilized soil is promising, but the study is still under-examined. To test the hypothesis, 434 days in vitro C mineralization kinetics of incubation experiment were conducted. Woody BC 0%, 0.5%, 1.0% and 2.0% (w/w) made of lead tree (Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de. Wit) were added to an Oxisols, and two Inceptisols of Taiwan. In each treatment, 5% swine manure compost (2 times recommended amount) was added and served as the over-fertilized soil. The results indicated that soil type strongly influenced the impact of BC addition on soil carbon mineralization potential. Respiration per unit of total organic carbon (total mineralization coefficient, TMC) of three studied soils significantly decreased with BC addition increased. Principal component analysis (PCA) suggested that for retaining more plant nutrients in addition to the effects of carbon sequestration, it is recommended that farmer could use locally produced biochars and composts in highly weathered and highly frequent tillage soil. Adding 0.5%-1% woody BC in soil should be reasonable and appropriate.

Subject Areas

Biochar; carbon mineralization; over-fertilization soils; compost; Ultisols

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