Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Fast and Effective Techniques for LWIR Radiative Transfer Modeling: A Dimension Reduction Approach

Version 1 : Received: 5 June 2019 / Approved: 7 June 2019 / Online: 7 June 2019 (14:45:54 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Westing, N.; Borghetti, B.; Gross, K.C. Fast and Effective Techniques for LWIR Radiative Transfer Modeling: A Dimension-Reduction Approach. Remote Sens. 2019, 11, 1866. Westing, N.; Borghetti, B.; Gross, K.C. Fast and Effective Techniques for LWIR Radiative Transfer Modeling: A Dimension-Reduction Approach. Remote Sens. 2019, 11, 1866.

Journal reference: Remote Sens. 2019, 11, 1866
DOI: 10.3390/rs11161866

Abstract

The increasing spatial and spectral resolution of hyperspectral imagers yields detailed spectroscopy measurements from both space-based and airborne platforms. Machine learning algorithms have achieved state-of-the-art material classification performance on benchmark hyperspectral data sets; however, these techniques often do not consider varying atmospheric conditions experienced in a real-world detection scenario. To reduce the impact of atmospheric effects in the at-sensor signal, atmospheric compensation must be performed. Radiative Transfer (RT) modeling can generate high-fidelity atmospheric estimates at detailed spectral resolutions, but is often too time-consuming for real-time detection scenarios. This research utilizes machine learning methods to perform dimension reduction on the transmittance, upwelling radiance, and downwelling radiance (TUD) data to create high accuracy atmospheric estimates with lower computational cost than RT modeling. The utility of this approach is investigated using the instrument line shape for the Mako long-wave infrared hyperspectral sensor. This study employs physics-based metrics and loss functions to identify promising dimension reduction techniques. As a result, TUD vectors can be produced in real-time allowing for atmospheric compensation across diverse remote sensing scenarios.

Subject Areas

Hyperspectral Imagery, Machine Learning, Atmospheric Compensation, Autoencoders, Radiative Transfer Modeling

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