Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

The Possibility of Gene Flow Between Cultivated and Wild Rice in Ghana, A Review

Version 1 : Received: 17 May 2019 / Approved: 20 May 2019 / Online: 20 May 2019 (10:09:42 CEST)

How to cite: Oppong, G.K.; Akomeah, B.; Tawiah, I.; Asante, M.D. The Possibility of Gene Flow Between Cultivated and Wild Rice in Ghana, A Review. Preprints 2019, 2019050238 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201905.0238.v1). Oppong, G.K.; Akomeah, B.; Tawiah, I.; Asante, M.D. The Possibility of Gene Flow Between Cultivated and Wild Rice in Ghana, A Review. Preprints 2019, 2019050238 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201905.0238.v1).

Abstract

Several transgenic rice lines have been developed and are currently under field trials around the world. There are future plans for the commercial release of transgenic rice into the environment. Rice is an autogamous plant and therefore not perceived to be a very high candidate for pollen mediated gene flow to wild and weedy relatives. However, in a tropical environment like Ghana, where sexually compatible wild Oryza species which belongs to the AA genome are present within the ecology of cultivated rice, the possibility of gene flow to wild species cannot be overlooked. There is little evidence on gene flow and its consequences on the wild rice species should they acquire useful genes through gene flow. This review discusses the chances of cultivated to wild rice gene flow in Ghana and the biosafety considerations that should be put in place before the commercial release of genetically modified (GM) rice.

Subject Areas

gene flow; Oryza species, wild rice; GM crops; biosafety

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