Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Exploring the Potential Soil Bacteria for Sustainable Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Production

Version 1 : Received: 19 April 2019 / Approved: 22 April 2019 / Online: 22 April 2019 (10:58:32 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Sheirdil, R.A.; Hayat, R.; Zhang, X.-X.; Abbasi, N.A.; Ali, S.; Ahmed, M.; Khattak, J.Z.K.; Ahmad, S. Exploring Potential Soil Bacteria for Sustainable Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Production. Sustainability 2019, 11, 3361. Sheirdil, R.A.; Hayat, R.; Zhang, X.-X.; Abbasi, N.A.; Ali, S.; Ahmed, M.; Khattak, J.Z.K.; Ahmad, S. Exploring Potential Soil Bacteria for Sustainable Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Production. Sustainability 2019, 11, 3361.

Journal reference: Sustainability 2019, 11, 3361
DOI: 10.3390/su11123361

Abstract

Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are capable to reduce the use of chemical fertilizers input cost of farmer. Keeping in view the study was designed to investigate and evaluate inoculation effect of indigenous rhizospheric bacteria on growth and yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) under in vitro and in vivo conditions using different treatments. Ten potential strains were selected on the basis of their ACC deaminase activity, siderophore production, P-solubilization and production of indole acetic acid (IAA). Further these strains were tested in three different experiments (growth chamber, pot and field). We found significant increase in crop growth response to the inoculants in comparison with un-inoculated control. In pot and field trial we tested PGPR with recommended dose of inorganic fertilizers. The results of present study revealed that inoculation of bacterial strains with wheat seeds significantly increased plant growth and improved crop yield. Results of present study reveal that these strains could be employed in different combinations and can get higher yield in case of half recommended doses of inorganic fertilizers along with consortium of strains in comparison with sole application of recommended dose of fertilizer and with consortium of strains. These strains were further identified by 16Sr RNA gene sequencing, fatty acid profile and biolog. It can be concluded that inoculated bacteria have more potential and contributes in good crop quality, increased yield when they are applied in combination, thus have potential to minimize use of chemical fertilizers.

Subject Areas

Inoculation; PGPR; Soil bacteria; Sustainable wheat

Comments (3)

Comment 1
Received: 22 April 2019
Commenter: Muhammad Ali Raza
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: Study is very interesting and helpful for famring community.
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Comment 2
Received: 22 April 2019
Commenter: Obaid Afzal
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: I found this a good approach to save cost on inorganic fertilizer and improving soil health. As unbridled use of chemical fertilizer has potential impacts on greenhouse gas emissions and jeopardize soil fauna. It is a kind of cool farming practice which is easy to implement and can play a significant role in mitigating climate change and improve soil productivity.
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Comment 3
Received: 22 April 2019
Commenter: SHAKEEL AHMAD
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: Excellent outcome of a dedicated team.
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