Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Advanced Nanotechnologies for Enhancing the Bioavailability of Silymarin: A State of the Art

Version 1 : Received: 12 April 2019 / Approved: 15 April 2019 / Online: 15 April 2019 (11:23:17 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Di Costanzo, A.; Angelico, R. Formulation Strategies for Enhancing the Bioavailability of Silymarin: The State of the Art.. Molecules 2019, 24, 2155. Di Costanzo, A.; Angelico, R. Formulation Strategies for Enhancing the Bioavailability of Silymarin: The State of the Art.. Molecules 2019, 24, 2155.

Journal reference: Molecules 2019, 24, 2155
DOI: 10.3390/molecules24112155

Abstract

Silymarin, a mixture of flavonolignan and flavonoid polyphenolic compounds extractable from the milk thistle seed, Silybum marianum, has anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and anti-viral activities potentially useful in the treatment of several liver disorders, such as chronic liver diseases, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Equally promising are the effects of silymarin in protecting the brain from the inflammatory and oxidative stress effects by which metabolic syndrome contributes to neurodegenerative diseases. However, despite clinical trials have proved that silymarin is safe at high doses (>1500 mg/day) in humans, it suffers limiting factors such as low solubility in water (<50 μg/mL), low bioavailability and poor intestinal absorption. To improve its bioavailability and provide a prolonged silymarin release at the site of absorption, the use of nanotechnological strategies appears to be a promising method to potentiate the therapeutic action and promote sustained release of the active herbal extract. The purpose of this study is to review the different nanostructured systems available in literature as delivery strategies to improve the absorption and bioavailability of silymarin.

Subject Areas

silymarin; silybin; nanoemulsion; solid lipid nanoparticles; nanostructured lipid carriers; liposome; polymeric particles; self-emulsifying delivery systems; enhanced bioavailability

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