Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Reasons Why Vegetable Cultivation Increases or does not Increase Vegetable Intake Among Adult Vegetable Growers Living in a City in Gunma Prefecture, Japan: A Qualitative Study

Version 1 : Received: 25 March 2019 / Approved: 26 March 2019 / Online: 26 March 2019 (10:49:20 CET)

How to cite: Machida, D.; Yoshida, T. Reasons Why Vegetable Cultivation Increases or does not Increase Vegetable Intake Among Adult Vegetable Growers Living in a City in Gunma Prefecture, Japan: A Qualitative Study. Preprints 2019, 2019030241 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201903.0241.v1). Machida, D.; Yoshida, T. Reasons Why Vegetable Cultivation Increases or does not Increase Vegetable Intake Among Adult Vegetable Growers Living in a City in Gunma Prefecture, Japan: A Qualitative Study. Preprints 2019, 2019030241 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201903.0241.v1).

Abstract

Objective: We examined the reasons why vegetable cultivation increases or does not increase vegetable intake among adult Japanese vegetable growers.Materials and Methods: A qualitative cross-sectional study using a self-completed anonymous questionnaire was sent to participants (aged 20–74 years residing in three areas of a city in Gunma Prefecture, Japan) in September 2016. The questionnaire addressed perceptions of whether vegetable cultivation would increase vegetable intake, with four possible answers: strongly disagree, disagree, agree, and strongly agree. Respondents were then asked reasons for their view, with free-text responses. We also asked about participants’ characteristics and whether they found that growing vegetables had changed their vegetable intake and access to vegetables. We categorized the free-text answers by content.Results: We analyzed 442 answers, and reasons for vegetable growing increasing vegetable intake were grouped into five categories: “availability,” “purpose of cultivation,” “quality,” “increased positive emotions toward vegetables,” and “unconsciousness”; for it not increasing intake were also grouped into five categories: “limited quantities,” “negative emotions toward vegetables,” “cultivation for a purpose other than eating vegetables,” “access to vegetables from other sources,” and “limits associated with self-cultivation.”Conclusion: We found five main reasons why vegetable growing may and may not increase vegetable intake.

Subject Areas

vegetable intake; vegetable cultivation; qualitative study; Japanese, adults

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.