Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Increase in Mutual Information During Interaction of the Brain with Environment Contributes to Perception

Version 1 : Received: 15 February 2019 / Approved: 18 February 2019 / Online: 18 February 2019 (10:08:19 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Gupta, D.S.; Bahmer, A. Increase in Mutual Information During Interaction with the Environment Contributes to Perception. Entropy 2019, 21, 365. Gupta, D.S.; Bahmer, A. Increase in Mutual Information During Interaction with the Environment Contributes to Perception. Entropy 2019, 21, 365.

Journal reference: Entropy 2019, 21, 365
DOI: 10.3390/e21040365

Abstract

Perception and motor interaction with physical surroundings can be analyzed by the changes in probability laws governing two possible outcomes of neuronal activity, namely the presence or absence of spikes (binary states). Perception and motor interaction with physical environment are accounted partly by the reduction in entropy within the probability distributions of binary states of neurons in distributed neural circuits, given the knowledge about the characteristics of stimuli in physical surroundings. This reduction in the total entropy of multiple pairs of circuits in networks, by an amount equal to the increase of mutual information among them, occurs as sensory information is processed successively from lower to higher cortical areas or between different areas at the same hierarchical level but belonging to different networks. The increase in mutual information is partly accounted by temporal coupling as well as synaptic connections as proposed by Bahmer and Gupta [1]. We propose that robust increases in mutual information, measuring the association between the characteristics of sensory inputs and neural circuits connectivity patterns, are partly responsible for perception and successful motor interactions with physical surroundings. It is also argued that perception from a sensory input is the result of networking of many circuits to a common circuit that primarily processes the given sensory input.

Subject Areas

Temporal processing of information, surprisal, temporal coupling; sparse coding, Shannon information, time-dimension in the brain

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