Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Evaluation of Antimicrobial Interventions against E. coli O157:H7 on the Surface of Raw Beef to Reduce Bacterial Translocation During Blade Tenderization

Version 1 : Received: 11 January 2019 / Approved: 14 January 2019 / Online: 14 January 2019 (12:15:28 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Muriana, P.M.; Eager, J.; Wellings, B.; Morgan, B.; Nelson, J.; Kushwaha, K. Evaluation of Antimicrobial Interventions against E. coli O157:H7 on the Surface of Raw Beef to Reduce Bacterial Translocation during Blade Tenderization. Foods 2019, 8, 80. Muriana, P.M.; Eager, J.; Wellings, B.; Morgan, B.; Nelson, J.; Kushwaha, K. Evaluation of Antimicrobial Interventions against E. coli O157:H7 on the Surface of Raw Beef to Reduce Bacterial Translocation during Blade Tenderization. Foods 2019, 8, 80.

Journal reference: Foods 2019, 8, 80
DOI: 10.3390/foods8020080

Abstract

The USDA-FSIS considers mechanically-tenderized beef as ‘non-intact’ and a food safety concern because of the potential for translocation of surface E. coli O157:H7 into the interior of the meat that may be cooked ‘rare or medium-rare’ and consumed. We evaluated 14 potential spray interventions on E. coli O157:H7-inoculated lean beef wafers (~106 CFU/cm2 , n=80) passing through a spray system (18 sec dwell time, ~40 PSI) integrated into the front end of a Ross TC-700MC tenderizer. Inoculated and processed beef wafers were stomached with D/E neutralizing broth and plated immediately, or were held in refrigerated storage for 1-, 7-, or 14 days prior to microbial plating. Seven antimicrobials that showed better performance in preliminary screening on beef wafers were selected for further testing on beef subprimals in conjunction with blade tenderization. Boneless top sirloin beef subprimals were inoculated at ~2 x 104 CFU/cm2 with a four-strain cocktail of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and passed once, lean side up, through an integrated spray system and blade tenderizer. Core samples obtained from each subprimal were examined for the presence/absence of E. coli O157:H7. Absence of E coli O157:H7 translocated into core samples correlated with the ability of the antimicrobials to reduce bacterial levels on the surface of beef prior to blade tenderization.

Subject Areas

E. coli O157:H7; non-intact beef; mechanical tenderization; blade tenderization; antimicrobial interventions; translocation

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