Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Family Functioning, Emotional Intelligence and Values: Analysis of the Relationship with Aggressive Behavior in Adolescents

Version 1 : Received: 22 December 2018 / Approved: 24 December 2018 / Online: 24 December 2018 (05:19:54 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Pérez-Fuentes, M.C.; Molero Jurado, M.M.; Barragán Martín, A.B.; Gázquez Linares, J.J. Family Functioning, Emotional Intelligence, and Values: Analysis of the Relationship with Aggressive Behavior in Adolescents. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 478. Pérez-Fuentes, M.C.; Molero Jurado, M.M.; Barragán Martín, A.B.; Gázquez Linares, J.J. Family Functioning, Emotional Intelligence, and Values: Analysis of the Relationship with Aggressive Behavior in Adolescents. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 478.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 478
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph16030478

Abstract

Aggressive behavior in adolescence is influenced by a diversity of individual, family and social variables. The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between family functioning, emotional intelligence and values for development of different types of aggression, as well as to establish profiles according to the predictor variables of aggression. To do this, a sample of 317 high school students aged 13 to 18 were administered the Peer Conflict Scale, the Family Functionality Scale, the Brief Emotional Intelligence Inventory for Senior Citizens and the Values for Adolescent Development Scales. The study showed that stress management, positive adolescent development and family functioning predominated in nonaggressive subjects with higher scores than aggressors. There was also a negative relationship between the different types of aggression and emotional intelligence, positive values and family functioning. In addition, two different profiles were found. The first had low scores on all the variables, while the second profile had higher scores on all the variables except family functioning which was higher.

Subject Areas

family functioning; aggressive behavior; emotional intelligence; adolescent values

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