Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Food Parenting Practices Among Parents with Overweight and Obesity: A Systematic Review

Version 1 : Received: 15 November 2018 / Approved: 16 November 2018 / Online: 16 November 2018 (10:31:50 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Patel, C.; Karasouli, E.; Shuttlewood, E.; Meyer, C. Food Parenting Practices among Parents with Overweight and Obesity: A Systematic Review. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1966. Patel, C.; Karasouli, E.; Shuttlewood, E.; Meyer, C. Food Parenting Practices among Parents with Overweight and Obesity: A Systematic Review. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1966.

Journal reference: Nutrients 2018, 10, 1966
DOI: 10.3390/nu10121966

Abstract

Abstract: Given the links between parental obesity and eating psychopathology in their children, it is important to understand the mechanisms via which unhealthy relationships with eating are passed from parents to children. The aim was to review research focusing on food-related parenting practices (FPPs) used by parents with overweight/obesity. Web of Science, PubMed and PsycINFO were searched. Twenty studies were included in the review. Single studies suggest differences between parents with healthy-weight vs overweight/obesity with respect to; food accessibility, food availability and modelling. Multiple studies suggest that several parenting strategies do not differ according to parental weight status (child involvement, praise, use of food to control negative emotions, use of food-based threats and bribes, pressure, restriction, meal and snack routines, monitoring, and rules and limits). There was inconclusive evidence with respect to differences in parental control, encouragement and use of unstructured FPPs among parents with healthy-weight vs overweight/obesity. The findings of this review imply some differences between parents with overweight/obesity and healthy-weight and the use of some food-related parenting practices, however they should be interpreted with caution since research remains limited and is generally methodologically weak. The review highlights opportunities for further research and to improve current measures of FPPs and help clarify current study findings.

Subject Areas

Children; Eating disorders; Eating behavior; Feeding practices; Obesity

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