Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Brother's Keeper or Only Child? Black Middle Class Responses to Residential Mobility Initiatives in Prince George's County, MD

Version 1 : Received: 2 November 2018 / Approved: 5 November 2018 / Online: 5 November 2018 (14:06:31 CET)

How to cite: Shinault, C. Brother's Keeper or Only Child? Black Middle Class Responses to Residential Mobility Initiatives in Prince George's County, MD. Preprints 2018, 2018110118 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201811.0118.v1). Shinault, C. Brother's Keeper or Only Child? Black Middle Class Responses to Residential Mobility Initiatives in Prince George's County, MD. Preprints 2018, 2018110118 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201811.0118.v1).

Abstract

The implications of urban revitalization, gentrification, and residential migration have attracted widespread interest and ongoing debate among scholars across a range of disciplines. While a significant body of literature explores race and class interactions within urban gentrifying neighborhoods, few have examined the environments that await those displaced by this process. This study explores the social and political impact of urban gentrification and class stratification within the black community by examining responses of black middle class residents in Prince George’s County, MD to the growing in-migration of low-income and minority residents from Washington, DC. Drawing on data from the U.S. Census Bureau, a multi-neighborhood sample of ninety-five black middle class residents of Prince George’s County, and informal interviews with subject-area experts, this study explores how race and class shape residential decisions and their impact on residential mobility initiatives. Residents responded to a 26-item survey that covered demographic information, political and community engagement, and their attitudes and beliefs about the poor, changes in their community, and racial unity and responsibility. Findings from cross tabulations and binary logistic regression indicate that lower middle class residents are the most likely to resist in-migration by exiting their communities and/or voting against proposals to create affordable housing options. Core and upper middle class residents were the most likely to stay in their neighborhoods despite increases in low-income migration, to vote in support of policies to create affordable housing options and to believe their responsibility to poor blacks could include sharing residential space.

Subject Areas

Gentrification; Residential Migration; Black Middle Class; Washington, DC; PG County, MD

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