Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Evaluation of Efficacy and Adherence to Gluten-Free Diet in Patients with Celiac Disease

Version 1 : Received: 15 October 2018 / Approved: 15 October 2018 / Online: 15 October 2018 (16:27:32 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Rodrigo, L.; Pérez-Martinez, I.; Lauret-Braña, E.; Suárez-González, A. Descriptive Study of the Different Tools Used to Evaluate the Adherence to a Gluten-Free Diet in Celiac Disease Patients. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1777. Rodrigo, L.; Pérez-Martinez, I.; Lauret-Braña, E.; Suárez-González, A. Descriptive Study of the Different Tools Used to Evaluate the Adherence to a Gluten-Free Diet in Celiac Disease Patients. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1777.

Journal reference: Nutrients 2018, 10, 1777
DOI: 10.3390/nu10111777

Abstract

Celiac disease (CD) is a genetically conditioned autoimmune process that appears in susceptible people. It can affect people of any age, and slightly predominates in females. It has a fairly homogenous global distribution, with an average prevalence of 1-2%, the frequency having increased in recent decades. The only effective treatment is a strict and permanent gluten-free diet (GFD), although the level of compliance with it is poor, at about 50% of cases. To monitor the effectiveness of the GFD, several procedures involving various approaches are employed: a) periodic interviews by nutritionists; b) clinical follow-up; c) serological controls of specific antibodies; d) endoscopies with collection of duodenal biopsies; e) structured questionnaires; f) determination of gluten peptides derived from gluten in feces and/or urine. All of these procedures are useful when applied, alone or in combination, depending on the cases. Some patients will only need to consult to their doctors, while others will require a multidisciplinary approach to assess their compliance with the GFD. In children, normalization of duodenal mucosa was achieved in 95% of cases within 2 years, while it is more delayed in adults, whose mucosa take longer to heal completely.

Subject Areas

celiac disease; gluten-free diet; effectiveness; adherence; nutritionists; clinic; serology; duodenal biopsies; structured questionnaires; peptides derived from gluten in feces and urine.

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