Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Phytosterol Composition of Arachis hypogaea Seeds from Different Maturity Classes

Version 1 : Received: 8 October 2018 / Approved: 9 October 2018 / Online: 9 October 2018 (04:02:35 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Zhou, W.; Branch, W.D.; Gilliam, L.; Marshall, J.A. Phytosterol Composition of Arachis hypogaea Seeds from Different Maturity Classes. Molecules 2019, 24, 106. Zhou, W.; Branch, W.D.; Gilliam, L.; Marshall, J.A. Phytosterol Composition of Arachis hypogaea Seeds from Different Maturity Classes. Molecules 2019, 24, 106.

Journal reference: Molecules 2018, 24, 106
DOI: 10.3390/molecules24010106

Abstract

The seeds of cultivated peanut, Arachis hypogaea, are an agronomically important crop produced for human nutrition, oilseed and feed stock. Peanut seed is the single most expensive variable input cost and thus producers require seed with excellence performance in terms of germination efficiency. During the maturation process, triglycerides are stored in oil bodies as an energy resource during germination and seedling development. The stability of oil body membranes is essential for nutrient mobilization during germination. This study focused on evaluating the phytosterol composition in seed components including the kernel, embryo (heart), and seed coat or skin. Samples of different maturity classes were analyzed for macronutrient and phytosterol content. The three most abundant phytosterols, β-sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol, comprised 82.29%, 86.39%, and 94.25% of seed hearts, kernels, and seed coats, respectively. Stigmasterol concentration was highest in the seed kernel providing an excellent source of this sterol known to have beneficial effects on human health. Peanut hearts contained the highest concentration of sterols by mass potentially providing protection and resources for the developing seedling. The amount of α-tocopherol increases in peanut hearts during the maturation process providing protection from temperature stress and stability required for seedling vigor. These results suggest that phytosterols may play a significant role in the performance of seeds and provides a possible explanation for the poor germination efficiency of immature seeds.

Subject Areas

phytosterols; mesocarp; oilseed; maturity; pod-blast; α-tocopherol; oil bodies; campesterol; stigmasterol; β-sitosterol

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