Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

A Convenient, Soil-Free Method for the Production of Root Nodules in Soybean to Study the Effects of Exogenous Additives

Version 1 : Received: 26 September 2018 / Approved: 27 September 2018 / Online: 27 September 2018 (03:59:07 CEST)

How to cite: Roy Choudhury, S.; Johns, S.M.; Pandey, S. A Convenient, Soil-Free Method for the Production of Root Nodules in Soybean to Study the Effects of Exogenous Additives . Preprints 2018, 2018090527 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201809.0527.v1). Roy Choudhury, S.; Johns, S.M.; Pandey, S. A Convenient, Soil-Free Method for the Production of Root Nodules in Soybean to Study the Effects of Exogenous Additives . Preprints 2018, 2018090527 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201809.0527.v1).

Abstract

Legumes develop root nodules that harbour endosymbiotic bacteria, rhizobia. These rhizobia convert nitrogen to ammonia by biological nitrogen fixation. A thorough understanding of the biological nitrogen fixation in legumes and its regulation is key to develop sustainable agriculture. It is well known that plant hormones affect nodule formation; however, most studies are limited to model legumes due to their suitability for in vitro, plate-based assays. Specifically, it is almost impossible to measure the effects of exogenous hormones or other additives during nodule development in crop legumes such as soybean as they have huge root system in soil. To circumvent this issue, the present research develops suitable media and growth conditions for efficient nodule development under in vitro, soil free conditions in an important legume crop, soybean. Moreover, we also evaluate the effects of all major phytohormones during soybean nodulation under identical conditions. This versatile, inexpensive, scalable and simple protocol provides several advantages over previously established methods. It is extremely time-and resource-efficient, does not require special training or equipment, and produces highly reproducible results. The approach is expandable to other large legumes as well as for other exogenous additives.

Subject Areas

soybean; nodulation; in vitro nodule development; phytohormones; ABA; JA; auxins; cytokinins; GA; BR

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