Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

The Use of Chinese Herbal Products for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma in Taiwan: A Population-Based Study

Version 1 : Received: 24 September 2018 / Approved: 26 September 2018 / Online: 26 September 2018 (05:09:08 CEST)

How to cite: Tseng, S.; Liu, C.; Wu, B.; Hung, Y.; Hsu, C.Y.; Chen, H.; Hu, W. The Use of Chinese Herbal Products for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma in Taiwan: A Population-Based Study. Preprints 2018, 2018090498 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201809.0498.v1). Tseng, S.; Liu, C.; Wu, B.; Hung, Y.; Hsu, C.Y.; Chen, H.; Hu, W. The Use of Chinese Herbal Products for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma in Taiwan: A Population-Based Study. Preprints 2018, 2018090498 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201809.0498.v1).

Abstract

In most countries, the incidence of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is no more than 1 per 100,000 for both men and women; however, it is much higher for men and women in Taiwan. The use of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) as complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of NPC and its treatment-related side effects has been increasing. The National Health Insurance (NHI) covers 99.6% of Taiwan’s residents. In the present population-based cohort study, we aimed to investigate the pattern of utilization of Chinese herbal products (CHPs) for NPC from 2001 through 2011 in Taiwan. We identified a total of 30294 patients with newly diagnosed NPC from the Registry for Catastrophic Illnesses Patient Database (RCIPD). Descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression analysis were employed to estimate the adjusted odds ratios (aORs) for CHP utilization. From 2001 through 2011, 17816 patients aged ≥20 years were newly diagnosed with NPC. Of these, 4749 patients used TCM outpatient services for NPC treatment. TCM users were more likely to be women, young, residents of Central Taiwan, and white-collar workers. The most commonly prescribed formula CHP was Gan-Lu-Yin, followed by Xin-Yi-Qing Fei-Tang and Shan-Shen-Mai-Men-Dong-Tang. The most commonly prescribed single CHP was Hedyotis diffusa, followed by Radix Scrophulariae and Radix Ophiopogonis. These findings provide information regarding personalized therapies for NPC and can promote further clinical experiments and pharmacological research on CHPs for NPC treatment in Taiwan. Further well-designed randomized controlled studies and basic mechanistic studies should assess the safety and effectiveness of CHPs for NPC treatment.

Subject Areas

nasopharyngeal carcinoma; traditional Chinese medicine; Chinese herbal products; complementary and alternative medicine; Gan-Lu-Yin

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