Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Is Consumption of 100% Orange Juice a Risk Factor for Overweight and Diabetes?

Version 1 : Received: 22 September 2018 / Approved: 24 September 2018 / Online: 24 September 2018 (11:51:47 CEST)

How to cite: Brouns, F. Is Consumption of 100% Orange Juice a Risk Factor for Overweight and Diabetes?. Preprints 2018, 2018090453 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201809.0453.v1). Brouns, F. Is Consumption of 100% Orange Juice a Risk Factor for Overweight and Diabetes?. Preprints 2018, 2018090453 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201809.0453.v1).

Abstract

Much epidemiological research confirms a correlation between a high consumption of sugar sweetened beverages and obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. In many of these studies, soft drinks, fruit drinks with added sugars and 100% fruit juices without added sugars were considered as one separate category and the total consumption was calculated cumulatively. Being able to make statements about the effects of individual types of drinks, as present in these clusters, is therefore impossible. However, recent data from well-controlled studies and meta-analyses on consumption of 100% fruit juice show that there is no effect on diabetes risks. Adults and children who choose to drink 100% juice appear to have a healthier lifestyle, consume better quality food and usually have a more favorable body weight. Although 100% fruit juice in relation to soft drinks contains a range of nutrients that are considered to be beneficial for health, the associated positive effects can be nullified by high sugar intake, in case of excessive consumption. That is why a golden rule can be applied: "100% fruit juice, as part of a healthy diet, is a healthy choice provided that you do not consume more juice than present in max. 1-3 fruits at a time. In the case of orange juice, this corresponds to a champagne glass full of juice (100-150ml). In this respect 100% fruit juice should be perceived as a nutritional drink that can be consumed with a meal and not as a thirst quencher.

Subject Areas

sugars, fructose, fruit juice, diabetes, overweight

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