Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

A Comparative Study of a 3D Bioprinted Gelatin-Based Lattice and Rectangular-Sheet Structures

Version 1 : Received: 30 July 2018 / Approved: 31 July 2018 / Online: 31 July 2018 (08:06:27 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Anil Kumar, S.; Tasnim, N.; Dominguez, E.; Allen, S.; Suggs, L.J.; Ito, Y.; Joddar, B. A Comparative Study of a 3D Bioprinted Gelatin-Based Lattice and Rectangular-Sheet Structures. Gels 2018, 4, 73. Anil Kumar, S.; Tasnim, N.; Dominguez, E.; Allen, S.; Suggs, L.J.; Ito, Y.; Joddar, B. A Comparative Study of a 3D Bioprinted Gelatin-Based Lattice and Rectangular-Sheet Structures. Gels 2018, 4, 73.

Journal reference: Gels 2018, 4, 73
DOI: 10.3390/gels4030073

Abstract

3D bioprinting holds great promise in the field of regenerative medicine as it can create complex structures in a layer-by-layer manner using cell-laden bioinks, making it possible to imitate native tissues. Current bioinks lack both the high printability and the biocompatibility required in this respect. Hence, the development of bioinks that are capable of both properties is needed. In our previous study, a furfuryl-gelatin based bioink, crosslinkable by visible light, was used for creating mouse mesenchymal stem cell-laden structures with high fidelity. In this study, lattice mesh geometries were printed in a comparative study to test against the properties of a traditional rectangular-sheet. After 3D printing and crosslinking, both structures were analysed for swelling and rheological properties, and their porosity estimated using scanning electron microscopy. Results showed that the lattice structure was relatively more porous but sturdy and exhibited a lower degradation rate compared to the rectangular-sheet. Further, the lattice allowed encapsulation of a greater number of cells, allowing them to proliferate to a greater extent compared to the rectangular-sheet that retained a lesser number of cells initially. All of these results collectively affirmed that the lattice poses as a superior scaffold design for tissue engineering applications.

Subject Areas

hydrogels; cardiac patches; 3D bioprinting; furfuryl-gelatin; lattice

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