Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Utilizing a Social Ecological Health Promotion and Community Based Participatory Research Frameworks to Engage Highly Diverse Populations for Recruitment in the All of Us Precision Medicine Program

Version 1 : Received: 16 July 2018 / Approved: 17 July 2018 / Online: 17 July 2018 (10:21:34 CEST)

How to cite: Mancera, B.M.; Sy, A.U.; Williams, C.D.; Hargreaves, M.K. Utilizing a Social Ecological Health Promotion and Community Based Participatory Research Frameworks to Engage Highly Diverse Populations for Recruitment in the All of Us Precision Medicine Program. Preprints 2018, 2018070303 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201807.0303.v1). Mancera, B.M.; Sy, A.U.; Williams, C.D.; Hargreaves, M.K. Utilizing a Social Ecological Health Promotion and Community Based Participatory Research Frameworks to Engage Highly Diverse Populations for Recruitment in the All of Us Precision Medicine Program. Preprints 2018, 2018070303 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201807.0303.v1).

Abstract

In response to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) All of Us Medicine Research Initiative, the Precision Medicine Research (PreMeR) Diversity Consortium was formed by four institutions from the Research Centers in Minority Institutions (RCMI) Translational Research Network (RTRN). This synergistic approach proposed evidence-based, best practices used by experienced researchers to engage, recruit and retain diverse populations in the All of Us initiative. Conceptualization of the proposed approach was aided by social influence theories to better understand how people’s beliefs and opinions should  be modified to affect change leading to action [1]. The Social-Ecological Model (SEM), for Health Promotion [2], from Stokols [1] and Community-Based Participatory (CBPR) Models[3],[4] guided proposed engagement, recruitment, and retention strategies contextualized with the individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, and policy spheres of influence. The PreMeR produced a partnership to evaluate and improve the effectiveness of current engagement, recruitment, and retention strategies for minority participation in scientific studies. This approach illustrates the need to incorporate multiple methods of engagement to reach a diverse audience to participate in scientific research. Engagement, recruitment, and retention strategies in community and biomedical research must be viewed as community engaged public health interventions, utilizing the same theoretical principles and approaches.

Subject Areas

community engagement; health disparities; precision medicine; participant recruitment

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