Preprint Review Version 3 This version is not peer-reviewed

Advances and Challenges of Biodegradable Implant Materials with a Focus on Magnesium-Alloys and Bacterial Infections

Version 1 : Received: 29 June 2018 / Approved: 2 July 2018 / Online: 2 July 2018 (16:34:52 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 2 July 2018 / Approved: 2 July 2018 / Online: 2 July 2018 (17:34:05 CEST)
Version 3 : Received: 11 July 2018 / Approved: 11 July 2018 / Online: 11 July 2018 (13:54:04 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Rahim, M.I.; Ullah, S.; Mueller, P.P. Advances and Challenges of Biodegradable Implant Materials with a Focus on Magnesium-Alloys and Bacterial Infections. Metals 2018, 8, 532. Rahim, M.I.; Ullah, S.; Mueller, P.P. Advances and Challenges of Biodegradable Implant Materials with a Focus on Magnesium-Alloys and Bacterial Infections. Metals 2018, 8, 532.

Journal reference: Metals 2018, 8, 532
DOI: 10.3390/met8070532

Abstract

Medical implants made of biodegradable materials could be of advantage for temporary applications such mechanical support during bone-healing or as vascular stents to keep blood vessels open. After completion of the healing process the implant would disappear, avoiding long-term side effects or the need for surgical removal. Various corrodible metal alloys based on magnesium, iron or zinc have been proposed as sturdier and potentially less inflammatory alternative to degradable organic polymers, in particular for load-bearing applications. Despite the recent introduction of magnesium-based screws the remaining hurdles to routine clinical applications are still challenging, such as limiting mechanical material characteristics or unsuitable corrosion characteristics. Here, salient features and clinical prospects of currently investigated biodegradable implant materials are summarized with a main focus on magnesium alloys. A mechanism of action for the stimulation of bone growth due to the exertion of mechanical force by magnesium corrosion products is discussed. To explain divergent in vitro and in vivo effects of magnesium a novel model for bacterial biofilm infections is proposed which predicts crucial consequences antibacterial implant strategies.

Subject Areas

bioresorbable implants; corrosion layer; vascular stents; orthopedic implants; microbial infections

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