Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

When water runs dry and temperature heats up: Understanding the mechanisms in rice tolerance to drought and high temperature stress conditions

Version 1 : Received: 26 June 2018 / Approved: 26 June 2018 / Online: 26 June 2018 (15:30:20 CEST)

How to cite: Rabara, R.; Msanne, J..; Ferrer, M.; Basu, S.. When water runs dry and temperature heats up: Understanding the mechanisms in rice tolerance to drought and high temperature stress conditions. Preprints 2018, 2018060426 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201806.0426.v1). Rabara, R.; Msanne, J..; Ferrer, M.; Basu, S.. When water runs dry and temperature heats up: Understanding the mechanisms in rice tolerance to drought and high temperature stress conditions. Preprints 2018, 2018060426 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201806.0426.v1).

Abstract

Rice production, owing to its high-water requirement for cultivation, is very vulnerable to the threat of changing climate, particularly prolonged drought and high temperature. Such threats heighten the need for abiotic stress-resilient rice varieties with better yield potential. This review examines the physiological and molecular mechanisms of rice varieties to cope with stress conditions of drought (DS), high temperature (HTS) and their combination (DS-HTS). It appraises research studies in rice about its various phenotypic traits, genetic loci and response mechanisms to stress conditions to help craft new breeding strategies for rice varieties with improved resilience to abiotic stresses. This review consolidates available information on promising rice cultivars with desirable traits as well as advocates synergistic and complementary approaches in molecular and systems biology to develop new rice breeds that favorably respond to climate-induced abiotic stresses. The development of new breeding and cultivation strategies for climate-resilient rice varieties is a challenging task. It requires a comprehensive understanding of the various morphological, biochemical, physiological, and molecular components governing yield under drought and high temperature, but possible by implementing cohesive approaches involving molecular and systems biology approaches in genomics and molecular breeding, including genetic engineering.

Subject Areas

rice, abiotic stress, high temperature, drought, physiological responses, molecular mechanisms, systems biology

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