Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

From Experimental Procedure to Clinical Practice: How Much Evidence Do We Need in Uterine Transplantation?

Version 1 : Received: 25 June 2018 / Approved: 26 June 2018 / Online: 26 June 2018 (12:58:08 CEST)

How to cite: Gainotti, S.; Petrini, C. From Experimental Procedure to Clinical Practice: How Much Evidence Do We Need in Uterine Transplantation?. Preprints 2018, 2018060420 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201806.0420.v1). Gainotti, S.; Petrini, C. From Experimental Procedure to Clinical Practice: How Much Evidence Do We Need in Uterine Transplantation?. Preprints 2018, 2018060420 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201806.0420.v1).

Abstract

Background: Absolute uterine factor infertility (AUFI) is a kind of infertility that is completely attributable to uterine absence (surgical or congenital for women with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome: MRKH) or anatomic or functional abnormality that prevents embryo implantation or completion of pregnancy to term. Until recently, the only viable option to parenthood for couples with AUFI were adoption or surrogacy. Since a first attempt of uterus transplant (UTx) in 2000, nine babies were born from women with a transplanted uterus from 2014, eight of which in Sweden, and one in the United States. These promising results are raising immense hopes for the women with AUFI and there is optimism about the possibility for UTx to become part of clinical care even though, besides encouraging results, the procedure has also resulted in increased risks and harms for both the donors and recipients and increased risks of premature birth for the fetus. At present UTx is still considered as experimental and requiring more research and safety assessment before becoming a therapeutic option for AUFI. The transition from experimental procedure to therapeutic care would result in less strict ethical scrutiny for UTx and in the possibility for patients to get reimbursement for the procedure by the relevant healthcare insurance or public healthcare providers. In turn, an increase in the number of UTx performed yearly by specialized surgical teams would result in a general improvement of the “field strength”. However, at present it is difficult to establish the amount of evidence that we need in order to consider UTx as no longer experimental but routine clinical practice. The literature on UTx provides recommendations on the different outcomes that should be monitored in this experimental phase but no study is anticipating the number of subjects that should be followed and for how long. Conclusion: As for other transplants that have become routine practice, like renal transplant and heart transplant, it is likely that the decision on “routine practice readiness” will result from available cumulated evidences, from expert capacity to find a consensus on best practices and on political considerations as well, including pressures form patients and patient groups.

Subject Areas

absolute uterine factor infertility; uterus transplant; experimental; clinical practice; ethics; living donors; risk assessment

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.